Category Archives: Communications

My Oil Sands is Dead. Long Live My Oil Sands!

Well, most of the behind-the-scenes stuff has been accomplished, so I feel confident in opening the floodgates on myoilsands.ca – the new home of my oil sands. The old myoilsands.wordpress.com is still available for viewing, but it will no longer be updated or allow comments to be posted.

So what are you waiting for? Go over and check it out! http://myoilsands.ca

Advertisements

More Ducks Land on Oil Sands Leases – News Sources You Should Follow

Well, the investigations are under way and the information is slowly making it’s way out about landings by waterfowl on multiple oil sands sites.

News sources to follow while this story continues to evolve are:

And while not a link to a news source, here is a link to the Federal Migratory Bird Act (if you were interested).

From a communications perspective, it’s going to be interesting to see how industry, government, non-government and the public react.

From a political/policy/regulations perspective, it’s going to be interesting to see how this plays out.

From my own personal point of view, this sucks.

—–

Did I miss some news sources you think should be on the list? Let me know, post a comment below or grab me on Twitter at @myoilsands

Candidates – Deadline is Sept 24th for Better Know A Candidate

I think I made a mistake – yes, I know. A mistake, but please don’t tell my wife, she thinks I’m perfect. (And if you believe that, I have an oil sands lease I’d like to offer you…)

So what is this mistake? I forgot to include a deadline for the Better Know A Candidate submissions.

Continue reading

Election 2010 Candidates – submit your Better Know A Candidate profile now

Your community. Your vote. RMWB Election 2010

With Labour Day upon us, there are 35 days until Election 2010 – October 18th will be the day that the municipal elections for the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo will be taking place.

As noted in late August, I thought it would be a good idea to host a Better Know Your Candidate – RMWB-style here on my oil sands.

Well, candidates can now start submitting their info – as the form is ready and waiting to be filled out.

Continue reading

CEMA Online – A Social Website?

CEMA Logo - property of CEMA

property of CEMA

On the 5th of August, the Cumulative Environmental Management Association released a new website – http://cemaonline.ca.

What’s CEMA you say? Well, their mission statement says:

“CEMA is a multi-stakeholder society that is a key advisor to the provincial and federal governments committed to respectful, inclusive dialogue to make recommendations to manage the cumulative environmental effects of regional development on air, land, water and biodiversity.”

After the website announcement, a few tweets flitted back and forth amongst the oil sands tribe, and then the very next day, Carol Christian of the Fort McMurray Today published an article entitled “Environmental agency embraces social media”.

Oil sands plus social media? You have my attention.

Continue reading

An Oil Sands Tribe: I Like It

Earlier today, Jeremy Dietz, a Calgary-based professional communicator, shed light on a recent trend. His post, Shifting Sands?, talks about the emergence of an Oil Sands Tribe –  an online community of people that are progressively  adding their voices to the oil sands / tar sands rhetoric. An online space that has been dominated by the anti-oil sands / anti-tar sands faction for a while now.

Jeremy Dietz

The first indication (at least to me) that this online debate was evolving beyond its lopsidedness was when I scanned through the comments on an NRDC anti-oil sands blog post. I was amazed to find that the vast majority of the people lending their voice to the debate were not NRDC supporters, but were pro-oil sands readers. Furthermore, these comments severely out-numbered those of the anti-oil sands online community.

I like this idea. I like this idea of an Oil Sands Tribe so much, that I wish I had posted about it first. Kudos Jeremy, kudos. Looks like we’ve both been reading some Godin.

I place myself in this camp, in this tribe. Yet as with all tribes, there are differences on the individual level. Some of us in the tribe try to use reason and facts to prove points, and some of us don’t. I prefer to think of myself as belonging in the former.

Those of us that rely on reasonable arguments are starting to have an impact, we are asking questions and probing lines of thought. This is needed.

Rational, intelligent debate is needed on issues of importance, and the oil sands are definitely important. They do after all impact the things that make the world go round: the economy, the environment, the transportation-slash-production-slash-everything- we-base-our-society-on sectors are all impacted by this industry, this community, this tribe.

So go read Jeremy’s post, and then come and interact with the tribe. You don’t have to share the same point of view – in fact, considering how complex the issue is, I can guarantee that you don’t. Heck, we don’t even all agree – it’s a complicated, multi-faceted topic, and informed discussion is a good thing.

Why This Blog

I have finally updated the “About” section of the blog – Part One is now live. Here’s an excerpt:

“The world needs oil. That’s the fact. Some people don’t like this, some do.

Most people, I imagine, don’t really think about oil and the role it plays in their lives.

But trust me on this, it’s a significant role.

And if you think you’re hearing about Fort McMurray and the Athabasca Oil Sands now, just you wait. Like it or not, as conventional oil sources are being exhausted around the globe, nations are turning to the “Canadian Oil Sands” to sate their demands.”

So what are you waiting for? Read the whole post.